How to Make DIY Edible Glitter

How To Make DIY Edible Glitter? Before you cringe and comment about how glitter is the Herpes of the craft world – let me tell you, it makes for a beautiful sweet treat decoration if it is the right kind.

How to Make DIY Edible Glitter article cover image of different colors of glitter

There WAS a time when we would only consider using glitter in our art class or for some other decorative activities. The thought of eating it was absurd! However, these days, you can quickly attend a party and see glitter all over the cake and not be scared to eat it.

Making it yourself opens a whole new world as far as color options! It is also a lot less expensive than purchasing it at the store – you literally make it for a fraction of the cost.

How to Make DIY Edible Glitter

We understand it may have sounded strange to many, but countless people are locked away in their homes with COVID-19 quarantine limitations and working on many DIY projects.

Sewing, Crafting, Baking, Cake Decorating, Gardening, Knitting, Crocheting, and so much more! Their new interests include stuff like these. All the fun tips and tricks are simple hacks that people are dying to master with their “free” time”.

If you aren’t aware of the new food-safe versions of glitter you might be among the many people who get concerned when they see food and drinks laced with glitter. They cringe at every bite they see people eating.

So, we will tackle the question of “can indulging in glitter harm you or possibly kill you?” Interestingly, there are two major types of glitter – edible and non-toxic*.

Based on medical experts’ research and analysis, if you happen to consume a small portion of the non-toxic glitter, you don’t have to worry too much as it is not enough to kill you. Reassuring, right? Ha!

However, seeing it won’t kill you does not give you the license to recklessly eat it. Try switching over entirely to the edible form. For edible glitter to be considered fully edible needs to be made from ingredients that are considered food by the FDA.

Let’s tackle some commonly asked questions first:

How dangerous can glitter be?

Glitter is a fun part of arts and crafts and can also be used as part of your baking and pastries for those who are excited about everything shiny. Strangely enough, the largest danger comes if you are not careful enough to keep it away from your eyes.

If the sparkle of the lustrous element gets in your eyes, there could be profound implications for trouble. It could cause damages to the cornea as it triggers lots of irritation. Add in the fact that non-edible glitter is usually made of hardened materials such as plastic or aluminum and may come with sharp edges? It’s a recipe for disaster.

Well, edible glitter may not be as destructive but bear in mind that no one wants to mess around with their eyes.

How do you make sugar sparkle?

If you are like me, living in the world of rainbows, confetti, and glitter, then knowing there is now a way to make edible glitter will become your new love affair.

A great way to dress up your cupcakes and donuts, especially for the kids, this a great skill to have.

There is also the option of buying pre-made glitter in the bakery section of the local grocery store but making it is half of the fun!

Depending on what end result you are after – there are different methods used to make the glitter in color, sparkle distribution, and glitter size. To know what is best for the project at hand, you can easily experiment with different varieties and make notes of what you like best.

Three different ways to Make DIY Edible Glitter – or sugar sparkle, if you prefer that name.

It is SO easy to Make DIY Edible Glitter! Making sugar sparkle is quite simple as all you need are raw cane sugar, coloring, a baking tray, and your oven. First, add the sugar to a bowl and add a few drops of coloring to it (use the color you desire or a mix of colors if you wish), and mix thoroughly.

You can also use granulated sugar if you like, but you will end up with a smaller grain of glitter. Once the mixture is equally colored – meaning the sugar is covered in the dye then get a baking tray and spread the sugar evenly across it. Place it in the oven set at an average of 350 degrees Fahrenheit. The thinner you apply the sugar mixture, the quicker it will bake as it will dry out faster.

You really need to keep an eye on it – depending on which sugar you use, how thick it is spread on your pan, etc there are too many variables to give an exact time but 5 to 10 minutes tops. Be mindful that if you over bake, the sugar might melt and leave the texture being gummy.

Once the paste is completely dried, remove it from the oven. When the sugar paste is cooled, break or crush it with your hands and store it in a sealed container. It can last for up to six months, with only the glisten of the glitter losing its touch the longer you wait to use it.

OK – I just love his accent -ha! He uses plain sugar for a smaller glitter.

I know they found pasta, rice, and sugar in the Egyptian pyramids that you could still eat today. Sugar pretty much lasts forever and is a preservative, but you compromise that structure with this coloring process.

What is edible glitter made out of?

Edible glitter can be made from various items you already have in your kitchen and even some you probably never thought were possible! Ever heard of the idea of making your own food coloring from veggies and fruits?

Well, this is just one of the many options you can choose from. The most common food you can choose from to make your glitter include sugar, gelatin, cornstarch, maltodextrin, and acacia – more commonly called gum Arabic. The colorings are made from different food items, or you can choose the store-bought liquid versions.

This one is gelatin based and super simple. It dries over night so it is a bit of a time consuming way to Make DIY Edible Glitter.

Adding edible glitter to my drink

The question has been asked numerous times whether edible glitter can be added to drink or not, and we will solve the mystery for you today – yes, it can! Interestingly you can add glitter to your drink to give it a sparkly presentation.

Whether you are enjoying your favorite cocktails, wine, coffee, beer, teas, or even sparkling water, you can add the glitter dust to enhance the experience. The lighter the drink, the brighter the sparkle! You can either make your own glitter (above) or purchase the ready-made version from the store.

You can also purchase the edible rainbow dust online from retailers who make them as part of their job or just as a passion. Making your drink sparkle does not have to be a tumultuous task, as all you need is your favorite drink and the edible glitter you either made or bought.

Add the liquor or wine to your glass, then sprinkle in the glitter and stir until the sparkly look is as desired. A little goes a long way, which is good as it can run $7-10 for a fairly small container.

For best results, hold off on the glitter magic until right before use or serving. It will be more vibrant and shimmery. Many people prefer to add the edible shimmer dust to their drink over the the sugar-based glitter as they fear it will melt away once it comes in contact with the liquid.

This is just fun for the kids to try – the non-alcoholic version, of course. Her shirt cracks me up too!

Is edible shimmer dust the same as edible glitter?

You might be wondering what the difference between edible shimmer dust and edible glitter is – well, there’s not much difference. The dust is basically a “refined version” of the glitter or considered the sieved dust from the larger glitter.

When sugar is sieved, there tend to be some smaller particulars that drop out, and this could pass as the glitter dust. Also, that crystallized glitter paste (from the gelatin recipe) is broken into larger pieces and ground into a powder. The more you grind it, the finer it will become.

Let your world enjoy a little of the fun life has to offer.  Come over to the dark with me and pop this easy-to-make whimsical treat topping into your list of cupcake decorating magic!

*This doesn’t account for poorly labeled glitter from China or other similar countries. Not to pick on China, but they have a track record of making things very inexpensively and occasionally cutting corners on safety factors. Just think of the poisoned drywall, toothpaste, pet food, baby food, etc – the list goes one. Always consider the source!

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